By what age do children in child care generally stop taking naps?

Child Care February 25, 2011 Print Friendly and PDF
Children of all ages need both active and quiet times every day. For infants and toddlers, quiet times are nap times when they need extra sleep. As children grow older, they may not need to sleep during the day. Quiet activities, like reading books, working on puzzles, stringing large beads, drawing, or playing board games, can give children a time for rest. As children grow older, they may not need to take an afternoon nap. This does not mean they can go, go, go all day. These children still need a quiet resting time built into their child care schedule. They just don't need to go to sleep. Each child is unique to his or her resting needs. Different children relax in different ways. Parents and child care providers can work together to offer each child the rest times and quiet times she needs. For more about napping and other milestones in physical development, check out the Better Kid Care America articles on physical development in infants, toddlers, and preschoolers.

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This work is supported by the USDA National Institute of Food and Agriculture, New Technologies for Ag Extension project.