Woodleaf Farm Insect Management System Table 4

Organic Agriculture May 02, 2016 Print Friendly and PDF

 This article is part of the Woodleaf Farm Organic Systems Description.

Table 4. Insect Damage Incidence 2014 (%)

Table 4. Insect Damage Incidence 2014.

  1. Oriental fruit moth (Grapholita molesta) monitoring consisted of two-four 100 fruit samples at each monitoring date (from a total of 15 peach varieties over the season) as fruit was developing (March-May) and at harvest (May-September). Average OFM damage across all peach varieties in 2014 occurred later in the season (late May-September) and was less than 3% of total fruit sampled.
  2. Western flower thrips (Frankliniella occidentalis) monitoring consisted of both branch (10/sample) and fruit (100/sample) samples. Thrips population density in spring branch samples (March) was relatively Low (< 1%) and fruit damage caused by thrips during fruit development (April-May) and at harvest (late May-September) generally averaged less than 1%.
  3. Aphid (Myzus persicae) monitoring consisted of 10 branches per sample. Aphids were only seen on pluots at a very low level.
  4. Codling moth (Cydia pomonella) monitoring consisted of three-five 100 fruit samples at each monitoring date (from a total of 2 pear varieties and 13 apple varieties over the season) as fruit was developing (late March-May) and at harvest (June-September). Average CM damage across all pear and apple varieties in 2014 occurred mostly later in the season (late May-September) peaking at 8% of total fruit sampled in late August.
  5. Spotted wing drosophila (Drosophila suzukii) monitoring consisted of two 100 fruit samples at each monitoring date (from a total of 2 cherry varieties) at harvest (May-July). Fruit damage was very high, peaking at 30% and 14% in June. Cherries were not sprayed in 2014 due to a light crop.

This table is part of the Woodleaf Farm Organic Systems Description.

Table of Contents:

 

 

 

This is an eOrganic article and was reviewed for compliance with National Organic Program regulations by members of the eOrganic community. Always check with your organic certification agency before adopting new practices or using new materials. For more information, refer to eOrganic's articles on organic certification.

eOrganic 14747

Connect with us

  • Twitter
  • Facebook
  • YouTube

Welcome

This is where you can find research-based information from America's land-grant universities enabled by eXtension.org

LOCATE

USDA / NIFA

This work is supported by the USDA National Institute of Food and Agriculture, New Technologies for Ag Extension project.