Brian Wansink, PhD, Cornell University

Healthy Food Choices in Schools June 01, 2015 Print Friendly and PDF

 

Brian Wansink is an expert in consumer behavior and food psychology. He is the National Program Leader of the Healthy Food Choices in Schools Community of Practice.

Brian is best known for his work on consumer behavior and food and for popularizing terms such as "mindless eating" and "health halos." His research has focused on how micro- environments influence what and how much people eat and how much they enjoy it.

Brian is currently the John S. Dyson Professor of Marketing at Cornell University. He is also director of the Cornell Food and Brand Lab  and co-directs the Cornell Center for Behavioral Economics in Child Nutrition Programs with Dr. David Just. Between 2007 and 2009 Brian was granted a leave from Cornell to become the Executive Director of the Center for Nutrition Policy and Promotion in Washington DC, leading the development of the USDA 2010 Dietary Guidelines. 

In 2009 Brian and Dr. David Just founded the Smarter Lunchrooms Movement (SLM) with the goal of creating sustainable research-based lunchrooms that guide smarter choices. SLM findings are featured here.

Brian is the author of the best-selling book Mindless Eating: Why We Eat More Than We Think (Bantam Dell 2006) and of the forthcoming book, Slim By Design: Mindless Eating Solutions for Everyday Life that will be available January 2014. He is also author of over 100 academic articles and books, including Marketing Nutrition (2005).

Brian received his Ph.D. in Consumer Behavior in 1990 from Stanford University. He founded the Food and Brand Lab in 1997 at the University of Illinois. In 2005 he moved with his Lab to the Dyson School of Applied Economics and Management at Cornell University in Ithaca, NY. 

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This work is supported by the USDA National Institute of Food and Agriculture, New Technologies for Ag Extension project.