Dipsacus fullonum, Common Teasel

Gardens & Landscapes, Invasive Species, Extension Master Gardener January 28, 2013 Print Friendly and PDF

Invasive Species: Dipsacus fullonum, Common Teasel

Common teasel is an invasive biennial plant that exists as a basal rosette until flower stems develop. The erect flower stems reach 6 ft. (1.8 m) in height and support spiny flower heads that are covered with small lavender to white flowers in April to September. Rosette leaves are lanceolate to oblanceolate, and stem leaves are opposite, lanceolate, and fused at the base. All leaves have short prickles on the midvein. Fruit is angled and approximately 0.08 to 0.12 in. (2 to 3 mm) long. Seeds are small and are dispersed by the wind after the seed-head has dried. Common teasel favors disturbed sites such as roadsides, ditches, waste places, riparian sites, fields, and pastures in most of the continental United States. Only recently was common teasel distinguished from fuller's teasel, which was once cultivated for the dried flower heads used in wool processing. It is native to Europe.

What are invasive species and why should we be concerned about them? 


Taxonomy: Scientific and Common Names for This Species

Dipsacales > Dipsacaceae > Dipsacus fullonum L.

Synonym(s): Fuller's teasel, teasel

Dipsacus fullonum - USDA PLANTS Profile

Distribution Maps

Common teasel - The reported distribution of this invasive species across the United States. (Source: Invasive Plant Atlas of the United States)

Up-to-the-minute distribution maps and why they are important

Reporting this Invasive Species

What is the best way and place to report the occurrence of an invasive species? 

 How to report an invasive species sighting to EDDMapS - Early Detection & Distribution Mapping System

EDDMapS - Report an invasive species to EDDMapS

Cooperative Extension Offices - Find your local Cooperative Extension office on this map provided by USDA

How to Identify

This invasive species can be identified by looking for the characteristics described in the paragraphs that follow.

Plant

Common teasel is an invasive biennial plant that exists as a basal rosette until flower stems develop.

Barry Rice, sarracenia.combugwood.org Steve Dewey, Utah State Universitybugwood.org

Foliage

Rosette leaves are lanceolate to oblanceolate, and stem leaves are opposite, lanceolate, and fused at the base. All leaves have short prickles on the midvein.

Steve Dewey, Utah State Universitybugwood.org Steve Dewey, Utah State Universitybugwood.org

Flower

The erect flower stems reach 6 ft. (1.8 m) in height and support spiny flower heads that are covered with small, lavender to white flowers in April to September.

Steve Dewey, Utah State Universitybugwood.org John M. Randall, The Nature Conservancybugwood.org

Fruit

Fruit is angled and approximately 0.08 to 0.12 in. (2-3 mm) long. Seeds are small and are dispersed by the wind after the seed-head has dried.

Bruce Ackley, The Ohio State Universitybugwood.org Steve Dewey, Utah State Universitybugwood.org

Native species which resemble common teasel

 

Eryngium leavenworthii , Leavenworth's eryngo - Images at invasive.org

Fort Worth Nature Center and Refuge Archive, City of Fort Worth, bugwood.org Fort Worth Nature Center and Refuge Archive, City of Fort Worth, bugwood.org

 

- Images at invasive.org

   
bugwood.org bugwood.org

 

Additional Images for common teasel

common teasel - Images at Invasive.org

 

Learning Resources for common teasel

Identification of the Wisconsin Invasive Species Dipsacus Fullonum - University of Wisconsin

 

Additional Information, Biology, Control and Management Resources

Control and management recommendations vary according to individual circumstances. Location, habitat, weather, and a variety of other conditions are factors that help determine the best treatment choice. To find the safest and most effective treatment for your situation, consult your state's land-grant institution. If you will use chemicals as part of the control process, always refer to the product label.

United States Land-Grant University System - Find your land-grant university's College of Agriculture, Cooperative Extension Service, or other related partner on this map provided by USDA.

Invasive.org - Center for Invasive Species and Ecosystem Health

Weed Identification Guide - Virginia Tech

Jepson Herbarium - University of California

Plant Profiles - Cal-IPC

 


 

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This work is supported by the USDA National Institute of Food and Agriculture, New Technologies for Ag Extension project.