Impatiens glandulifera, Ornamental Jewelweed

Gardens & Landscapes, Invasive Species, Extension Master Gardener November 10, 2012 Print Friendly and PDF

Invasive Species: Impatiens glandulifera, Ornamental Jewelweed

Ornamental jewelweed is an invasive annual. It is a succulent that can grow to be 3 to 10 ft. (0.9 to 3 m) tall. The stems are purple-tinged and hollow with opposite or whorled, elliptical leaves. Leaves are simple, serrate, and 6 in. (15.2 cm) long. Flowering occurs from June to October when white, irregular, solitary flowers appear on axillary stalks. Fruits are five chambered capsules that, when mature, explode when touched. Ornamental jewelweed is native to India and occurs in areas with high soil moisture, such as riparian areas. Plants are partially shade tolerant.

What are invasive species and why should we be concerned about them? 


Taxonomy: Scientific and Common Names for This Species

Geraniales > Balsaminaceae > Impatiens glandulifera Royle

Impatiens glandulifera - USDA PLANTS Profile

Distribution Maps

Ornamental jewelweed - The reported distribution of this invasive species across the United States (Source: Invasive Plant Atlas of the United States)

Up-to-the-minute distribution maps and why they are important 

Reporting This Invasive Species

What is the best way and place to report the occurrence of an invasive species? 

 How to report an invasive species sighting to EDDMapS - Early Detection & Distribution Mapping System

EDDMapS - Report an invasive species to EDDMapS.

Cooperative Extension Offices - Find your local Cooperative Extension office on this map provided by USDA.

How to Identify

This invasive species can be identified by looking for the characteristics described in the paragraphs that follow.

Plant

Ornamental jewelweed is a succulent annual than can be 3 to 10 ft. (0.9 to 3 m) tall. The stems are purple-tinged and hollow.

Barbara Tokarska-Guzik, University of Silesia, bugwood.org Leslie J. Mehrhoff, University of Connecticut,   bugwood.org

Foliage

The stem's leaves are opposite or whorled and elliptical. Leaves are simple, serrate, and 6 in. (15.2 cm) long.

Barbara Tokarska-Guzik, University of Silesia,   bugwood.org Leslie J. Mehrhoff, University of Connecticut,     bugwood.org

Flower

Flowering occurs from June to October when white, irregular, solitary flowers appear on axillary stalks.

Barbara Tokarska-Guzik, University of Silesia,   bugwood.org Barbara Tokarska-Guzik, University of Silesia,   bugwood.org

Fruit

Fruits are five-chambered capsules that, when mature, explode when touched.

Barbara Tokarska-Guzik, University of Silesia,    bugwood.org Leslie J. Mehrhoff, University of Connecticut, bugwood.org

Native Species That Can Resemble Ornamental Jewelweed

Impatiens capensis, jewelweed - Bugwood.org

Rob Routledge, Sault College, bugwood.org Chris Evans, Illinois Wildlife Action Plan, bugwood.org

Impatiens pallida, jewelweed - Bugwood.org

Chris Evans, Illinois Wildlife Action Plan, bugwood.org Charles T. Bryson, USDA Agricultural Research Service, bugwood.org

Additional Images for Ornamental Jewelweed

ornamental jewelweed - Images at Invasive.org

Learning Resources for Ornamental Jewelweed

Impatiens glandulifera Identification Card - US Fish & Wildlife Service

Impatiens glandulifera Fact Sheet - US Fish & Wildlife Service

Additional Information, Biology, Control and Management Resources

Control and management recommendations vary according to individual circumstances. Location, habitat, weather, and a variety of other conditions are factors that help determine the best treatment choice. To find the safest and most effective treatment for your situation, consult your state's land-grant institution. If you will use chemicals as part of the control process, always refer to the product label.

United States Land-Grant University System - Find your land-grant university's college of agriculture, Cooperative Extension office, or other related partner on this map provided by USDA.

Global Invasive Species Database - Invasive Species Specialist Group (ISSG)

Invasive Plant Atlas of New England - University of Connecticut

Noxious Weeds - King County, Washington


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This work is supported by the USDA National Institute of Food and Agriculture, New Technologies for Ag Extension project.