Apple Fruit Shapes

Apples May 29, 2012 Print Friendly and PDF

 

Fruit shape is one of several characteristics used to identify apple cultivars. When apples are mature, the fruit is cut longitudinally in half  through the core to categorize the shape. Common fruit shapes include round, conic, oblate, oblique, oblong, and ovate as shown below (Figure 1).  Fruit shape may differ by growing location depending on environmental conditions. For example, 'Red Delicious' ripened in locations with cool evening temperatures are more elongated than those ripened in climatic zones with evening temperatures remain above 80°F. Spring frosts and pests may also alter fruit shape. 

'Rome Beauty' round (photo: USDA-ARS-GRIN). Visit ARS-GRIN for more information. 'Braeburn' conic (photo: USDA-ARS-GRIN). Visit ARS-GRIN for more information.

Rome Beauty
 

Braeburn
 

'Redfree' oblate (photo: USDA-ARS-GRIN). Visit ARS-GRIN for more information. 'York Imperial' oblique (photo: USDA-ARS-GRIN). Visit ARS-GRIN for more information.
Redfree
 

Yorking
 
'Red Delicious' oblong (photo: USDA-ARS-GRIN). Visit ARS-GRIN for more information. 'Spigold' (photo: USDA-ARS-GRIN). Visit ARS-GRIN for more information.


Delicious
 


Spigold
 

 

Figure 1: Apple fruit shape as defined by Hedrick in 1924.  In the legend, a cultivar is listed first, then the shape.  

From Hedrick’s “Systematic Pomology” 1924.
Michele Warmund, University of Missouri

 

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