Mechanical Hazards: Burn Points

Ag Safety and Health September 22, 2016 Print Friendly and PDF

Massey Ferg Tractor Exhaust

(Source: Penn State Agricultural Safety & Health)

 

Use the following format to cite this article:

Mechanical hazards: Burn points. (2012). Farm and Ranch eXtension in Safety and Health (FReSH) Community of Practice. Retrieved from http://www.extension.org/pages/66316/mechanical-hazards:-burn-points.

 

Burn-point hazards are associated with tractors, self-propelled equipment, and pull-type machinery. These pieces of equipment have components that can cause burns when they contact skin. The most common activities that result in burn-point incidents include maintenance, inspection, fueling, and servicing of machines.

The following components and machinery elements can be burn points:

  • Mufflers
  • Manifolds
  • Engine blocks
  • Gear cases 
  • Pipes 
  • Hot fluids (fuel, oil, chemicals, and so on) 

Potential Injuries

Burns are the most obvious type of injury sustained due to burn-point hazards. However, additional injuries can occur if operators are startled by contact with burn points. For example, a producer might contact a hot muffler and fall back onto a toolbox, getting a back injury in addition to the burn.

Safety Precautions

The list below outlines ways of reducing the risk of a burn-point incident.

  • Check machinery for burn points and avoid those areas.
  • Shut down the engine and allow time for fluids and parts to cool before completing any fueling, inspections, or maintenance.
  • Do not touch the engine or machine parts during an inspection.
  • Determine whether a part is hot by holding your hand near the surface of the part.
  • Wear leather gloves to protect your hands.

Resources

Click here to view a video about burn-point hazards from Pennsylvania State University’s Agricultural Safety and Health Program.

 

Use the following format to cite this article:

Mechanical hazards: Burn points. (2012). Farm and Ranch eXtension in Safety and Health (FReSH) Community of Practice. Retrieved from http://www.extension.org/pages/66316/mechanical-hazards:-burn-points.

 

Sources

Agricultural equipment and machine hazards. (2016) The Ohio State University. Retrieved from http://agsafety.osu.edu/programs/cfaes-osha/ag-equipment-machine-hazards.

Grisso, R., Stone, B., & Hetzel, G. (2009) Machinery safety on the farm. Virginia Cooperative Extension. Retrieved from http://pubs.ext.vt.edu/442/442-092/442-092_pdf.pdf.

Harshman, W., Yoder, A., Hilton, J., & Murphy, D. (2011) Mechanical hazards. HOSTA Task Sheet 3.1. Pennsylvania State University Agricultural and Biological Engineering Department. Retrieved from http://extension.psu.edu/business/ag-safety/youth-safety/national-safe-t....

 
Reviewed and Summarized by:
Linda M. Fetzer, Pennsylvania State University – lmf8@psu.edu
LaMar Grafft, East Carolina University grafftl@ecu.edu
Jimmy Maass, Virginia Farm Bureau Insurance (Has since retired)
Dennis J. Murphy, Pennsylvania State University – djm13@psu.edu
Aaron M. Yoder, University of Nebraska Medical Center - aaron.yoder@unmc.edu

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