The Cowpea Weevil, a Stored Product Pest

Pest Management In and Around Structures May 20, 2012 Print Friendly and PDF

 


(A) Adult cowpea weevils have long legs, long antennae, and abbreviated wing covers that do not completely cover the abdomen.
(B) Adults also have an enlarged femur on the hind leg that bears a single, large tooth.

Cowpea weevil, Callosobruchus maculatus, adults have long antennae and long legs with an enlarged femur on the hind leg that bears a single, large tooth. The wing covers of the weevil have a large, rounded spot at mid-length. They do not completely cover the abdomen, leaving part of it exposed. Like rice weevils, cowpea weevil adults sometimes play dead when disturbed.

Cowpea weevils lay eggs on leguminous seeds such as chickpea, pigeon pea, garden peas, mung beans, cowpeas, black-eyed peas, soybeans, peas, lima beans, and lentils. The eggs hatch and the first instar larva then burrows into the seed to begin consuming it from the inside. All larval stages are spent inside the seed, where they remain concealed and protected as they feed. The last instar larva pupates inside the seed. After emergence from the pupa, the adult beetle chews its way out of the seed, leaving a characteristic round hole in the seed’s shell (Figure C). Although adults are short-lived and do not feed, they are very active, known to run rapidly, and are strong fliers.

(C) Some stored product beetles, such as cowpea weevils (pictured above) and rice weevils, leave a characteristic round hole in the items they infest. After emergence from the pupa while still inside the bean or seed, the adult beetle must then chew its way out of the infested item to free itself, leaving a characteristic round hole in the process. Arrow indicates egg.







































 

 

 

"Stored Product Pests in the Home" is a production of the Department of Entomology and Plant Pathology, University of Georgia. The original authors of this content are Daniel R. Suiter, Michael D. Toews and Lisa M. Ames.

Connect with us

  • Twitter
  • Facebook
  • YouTube
  • Pinterest
  • Google+

Welcome

This is where you can find research-based information from America's land-grant universities enabled by eXtension.org

LOCATE

USDA / NIFA

This work is supported by the USDA National Institute of Food and Agriculture, New Technologies for Ag Extension project.