Acer ginnala, Amur Maple

Gardens & Landscapes, Invasive Species, Extension Master Gardener February 22, 2012 Print Friendly and PDF

Invasive Species: Acer ginnala, Amur Maple

Amur maple is an invasive multi-stemmed shrub or small tree that grows from 10 to 20 ft. (3 to 6 m) tall. The leaves are opposite and simple. They are three-lobed, doubly serrate, 1.5 to 3 in. (3.8 to 7.6 cm) long, and 3/4 to 1.5 in. (1.3 to 3.8 cm) wide. Flowering occurs in the spring, when small, yellowish white, fragrant flowers develop in small panicles. The fruit is a red to brown double samara. This species prefers moist, well-drained soils in full sun or partial shade. Amur maple is a native of northern Asia and was introduced in the United States as an ornamental plant around 1860.

What are invasive species, and why should we be concerned about them? 


Taxonomy: Scientific and Common Names for This Species

Sapindales > Aceraceae > Acer ginnala Maxim.

Synonym(s): none

Acer ginnala - USDA PLANTS Profile

Distribution Maps

Amur maple - The reported distribution of this invasive species across the United States (Source: Invasive Plant Atlas of the United States)

Up-to-the-minute distribution maps and why they are important 

Reporting This Invasive Species

What is the best way to report the occurrence of an invasive species? 

How to report an invasive species sighting to EDDMapS - Early Detection & Distribution Mapping System 

EDDMapS - Report an invasive species to EDDMapS.

County Extension Offices - Find your county Extension office on this map provided by USDA.

How to Identify

This invasive species can be identified by looking for the characteristics described in the paragraphs that follow.

Tree

Amur maple is a multi-stemmed tall shrub or small tree that grows from 10 to 20 ft. (3 to 6 m) tall.

Stacey Leicht, University of Connecticut, bugwood.org Karan A. Rawlins, University of Georgia, bugwood.org

Foliage

The opposite, simple leaves are three-lobed and doubly serrate. They are 1.5 to 3 in. (3.8 to 7.6 cm) long and 3/4 to 1.5 in. (1.3 to 3.8 cm) wide.

Paul Wray, Iowa State University, bugwood.org Karan A. Rawlins, University of Georgia, bugwood.org

Flower

Flowering occurs in the spring, when small, yellowish white, fragrant flowers develop in small panicles.

Paul Wray, Iowa State University, bugwood.org Leslie J. Mehrhoff, University of Connecticut, bugwood.org

Fruit

The fruit is a red to brown double samara.

Paul Wray, Iowa State University, bugwood.org Leslie J. Mehrhoff, University of Connecticut, bugwood.org

Native Acer Species Resemble Amur Maple

Acer saccharinum, silver maple - Images at invasive.org

Paul Wray, Iowa State University, bugwood.org Paul Wray, Iowa State University, bugwood.org

 

Acer rubrum, red maple - Images at invasive.org

Keith Kanoti, Maine Forest Service, bugwood.org Rebekah D. Wallace, University of Georgia, bugwood.org

 

Additional Images for Amur Maple

Amur maple - Images at invasive.org

 

Learning Resources for Amur Maple

 

Additional Information, Biology, Control and Management Resources

Control and management recommendations vary according to individual circumstances. Location, habitat, weather, and a variety of other conditions are factors that help determine the best treatment choice. To find the safest and most effective treatment for your situation, consult your state's land-grant institution. If you will use chemicals as part of the control process, always refer to the product label.

United States Land Grant University System - Find your Land Grant University's College of Agriculture, University Cooperative Extension Service, or other related partner on this map provided by USDA.

Invasive Plant Atlas of New England - University of Connecticut

Weed of the Week - USDA Forest Service

Invasive terrestrial plants - Minnesota Department of Natural Resources

Global Invasive Species Database - Invasive Species Specialist Group (ISSG)

Robert W. Freckmann Herbarium - University of Wisconsin, Stevens Point


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This work is supported by the USDA National Institute of Food and Agriculture, New Technologies for Ag Extension project.