How to Breed for Organic Production Systems Webinar

Plant Breeding and Genomics October 23, 2012 Print Friendly and PDF

Authors:

Jim Myers, Oregon State University; Heather L. Merk, The Ohio State University

During this webinar Dr. Jim Myers provides an introduction to organic production systems, as well as a rationale for breeding for organic production systems. Dr. Myers describes examples using broccoli, sweet corn, and zucchini.

This webinar introduces breeding for organic production systems, including:

  • Rationale for breeding for organic production
  • Comparisons between organic and conventional performance and production systems
  • National Organic Program (NOP) requirements that may impact breeding

This webinar also explores three examples of breeding for organic production systems.

This one hour webinar has been divided into seven videos, which are listed in order on this webpage. The eighth video is the full webinar. The powerpoint slides (in pdf format) are provided at the bottom of the page.

Learning Objectives

After this webinar, you should be able to:

  • Understand the rationale for breeding for organic production systems
  • Compare conventional and organic production systems
  • Describe how NOP requirements may influence organic breeding programs
  • Describe examples for breeding for organic production in broccoli, sweet corn, and zucchini

Video

  • Part 1 - Introduction organic production and rationale for breeding for organic production systems
  • Part 2 - Comparing organic and conventional production systems
  • Part 3 - Compares organic and conventional breeding approaches
  • Part 4 - NOVIC participatory broccoli breeding project
  • Part 5 - Participatory sweet potato breeding project in Minnesota and the darkstar zucchini breeding project
  • Part 6 - General themes in organic breeding
  • Part 7 - Question and answer session
  • Full Video

Part 1

Introduction organic production and rationale for breeding for organic production systems.

If you experience problems viewing this video connect to our YouTube channel or see the YouTube troubleshooting guide.

Part 2

Comparing organic and conventional production systems.

If you experience problems viewing this video connect to our YouTube channel or see the YouTube troubleshooting guide.

Part 3

Compares organic and conventional breeding approaches.

 If you experience problems viewing this video connect to our YouTube channel or see the YouTube troubleshooting guide.

Part 4

NOVIC participatory broccoli breeding project.

If you experience problems viewing this video connect to our YouTube channel or see the YouTube troubleshooting guide.

Part 5

Participatory sweet potato breeding project in Minnesota and the darkstar zucchini breeding project.

If you experience problems viewing this video connect to our YouTube channel or see the YouTube troubleshooting guide.

Part 6

General themes in organic breeding.

If you experience problems viewing this video connect to our YouTube channel or see the YouTube troubleshooting guide.

Part 7

Question and answer session.

If you experience problems viewing this video connect to our YouTube channel or see the YouTube troubleshooting guide.

Full Video

Full 58 minute webinar.

If you experience problems viewing this video connect to our YouTube channel or see the YouTube troubleshooting guide.

About the Presenter

Jim Myers portrait

Dr. Jim Myers holds the Baggett-Frazier Endowed Chair of Vegetable Breeding and Genetics in the Department of Horticulture at Oregon State University. He works on a number of crops including dry and snap bean, edible podded pea, broccoli, tomato, winter and summer squash, and sweet corn. His main interest has been to improve vegetable varieties for disease resistance and human nutrition while maintaining quality and productivity in improved varieties. Dr. Myers is also breeding tomatoes, broccoli, and summer squash for organic systems. His latest variety release is the high anthocyanin tomato 'Indigo Rose'.

Register for, or watch other plant breeding and genomics "How To" webinars

Funding Statement

Development of this page was supported in part by the National Institute of Food and Agriculture (NIFA) Solanaceae Coordinated Agricultural Project, agreement 2009-85606-05673, administered by Michigan State University. Any opinions, findings, conclusions, or recommendations expressed in this publication are those of the author(s) and do not necessarily reflect the view of the United States Department of Agriculture.

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This work is supported by the USDA National Institute of Food and Agriculture, New Technologies for Ag Extension project.