Genetic Markers: Conifer Genomics Module 6

Plant Breeding and Genomics April 22, 2013 Print Friendly and PDF

Authors:

Nicholas Wheeler, Oregon State University; Jill Wegrzyn, University of California, Davis; David Harry, Oregon State University; Heather L. Merk, The Ohio State University

This is the sixth module in a series of 17 developed by the Conifer Translational Genomics Network (CTGN) and Pine Reference Sequence (PineRefSeq). This foundation module by CTGN reviews genetic markers.

Introduction

This module reviews genetic markers. The topic of genetic markers, similar to the topics covered in modules 1-5, could embrace a wide range of material encompasing an entire course. This constrained treatment focuses largely on the SNP, or single nucleotide polymorphism, following a general introduction. To say that markers are important to the science of genetics is an understatement. Not only have they provided the tools to investigate genetic mechanisms, but they are the means by which we endeavor to dissect complex genetic traits and complement traditional crop improvement methods.

Module Screen Shot and Link

 

Module 6 — Genetic Markers

See other Conifer Genomics Modules

 

You can also watch this video on YouTube.

References Cited

  •  Baker, M. 2010. Next-generation sequencing: adjusting to data overload. Nature Methods 7: 495–499. (Available online at: http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/nmeth0710-495) (verified 31 May 2011).
  • Pierce, B. A. 2010. Genetics Essentials: Concepts and Connections 1st Edition. W. Freeman and Co., New York.
  • Shendure, J., and H. Ji. 2008. Next-generation DNA sequencing. Nature Biotechnology 26: 1135-1145. (Available online at: http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/nbt1486) (verified 23 March 2011).
  • White, T. L, W. T. Adams, and D. B. Neale. 2007. Forest genetics. CAB International, Wallingford, United Kingdom. (Available online at: http://bookshop.cabi.org/?page=2633&pid=2043&site=191) (verified 27 Apr 2011).

External Links

  • National Center for Biotechnology Information [Online]. U.S. National Library for Medicine, National Institutes of Health. Available at: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov (verified 31 May 2011).

Additional Resources

  • Fagaceae genomics web: Genomic tools for chestnut, oak, beech, and other trees [Online]. Available at: http://fagaceae.org (verified 31 May 2011).
  • Neale, D., J. Wegrzyn, B. Figueroa, and J. Yu. Tree genes: A forest tree genome database [Online]. University of California at Davis. Available at: http://dendrome.ucdavis.edu/treegenes (verified 31 May 2011).
  • Treenomix [Online]. University of British Columbia. Available at: http://www.treenomix.ca (verified 31 May 2011).

Cite This Learning Module

  • Wheeler, N., J. Wegrzyn, and D. Harry. Genetic markers [Online Learning Module]. Genomics in Tree Breeding and Forest Ecosystem Management, Conifer Translational Genomics Network. eXtension Foundation. Available at: www.extension.org/pages/60385 (verified April 22, 2013).

Author Contributions

  • Nicholas Wheeler, Jill Wegrzyn, and David Harry developed the learning module content.
  • Heather Merk developed the webpage.

Funding Statement

Support for the Conifer Translational Genomics Network project and the development of the teaching modules hosted here was provided by the USDA/NRI CSREES Plant Genomics Coordinated Agricultural Project (CAP) Award # 2007-55300-18603, the USDA/NIFA AFRI Applied Plant Genomics CAP Award #2009-85606-05680 and the USDA Forest Service. Development of this page was supported in part by the National Institute of Food and Agriculture (NIFA) Solanaceae Coordinated Agricultural Project, agreement 2009-85606-05673, administered by Michigan State University. Any opinions, findings, conclusions, or recommendations expressed in this publication are those of the author(s) and do not necessarily reflect the view of the United States Department of Agriculture.

Attachments:

Markers.pdf (1.96 MB)

PBGworks 1067

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This work is supported by the USDA National Institute of Food and Agriculture, New Technologies for Ag Extension project.