Video Clip: Winter Rye for Strawberry Mulch from Vegetable Farmers and their Innovative Cover Cropping Techniques

Organic Agriculture June 15, 2011 Print Friendly and PDF

Source:

Farmers and their Innovative Cover Cropping Techniques [DVD]. V. Grubinger. 2006. University of Vermont Extension. Available for purchase from: http://www.uvm.edu/vtvegandberry/Videos/covercropvideo.html (Verified 31 Dec 2008).

This is a Vegetable Farmers and their Innovative Cover Cropping Techniques video clip

Featuring

Cliff Hatch, Upinngill Farm. Gill, MA.

Audio Text

This is rye left from last year, last year’s crop, we harvest this in June. It’s mowed when the plants have reached maximum height and they’re just casting their pollen, it wants to be mowed before there’s any seed set cause otherwise you’re just spreading weeds on your field. But the early mowing gives you a chance that any weeds in your field won't have set any seed. And they’ll be green if they’re in this bale but it’s the most weed free mulch available, June harvested rye. If it’s mowed with a mower conditioner you’ll have much better drying results it’ll usually go through your chopper a lot better too.

What we try to do is mow our rye, bale it up, have it ready for our fall when we have to put it on as mulch. Most years we’re not planting berries till June or July depending on how the season goes.

This video project was funded in part by the Northeast Sustainable Agriculture Research and Education Program (USDA).

This is an eOrganic article and was reviewed for compliance with National Organic Program regulations by members of the eOrganic community. Always check with your organic certification agency before adopting new practices or using new materials. For more information, refer to eOrganic's articles on organic certification.

eOrganic 6027

Connect with us

  • Twitter
  • Facebook
  • YouTube

Welcome

This is where you can find research-based information from America's land-grant universities enabled by eXtension.org

LOCATE

USDA / NIFA

This work is supported by the USDA National Institute of Food and Agriculture, New Technologies for Ag Extension project.