Video Clip: Frost Seeded Red Clover from Vegetable Farmers and their Innovative Cover Cropping Techniques

Organic Agriculture June 15, 2011 Print Friendly and PDF

Source:

Farmers and their Innovative Cover Cropping Techniques [DVD]. V. Grubinger. 2006. University of Vermont Extension. Available for purchase from: http://www.uvm.edu/vtvegandberry/Videos/covercropvideo.html (Verified 31 Dec 2008).

This is a Vegetable Farmers and their Innovative Cover Cropping Techniques video clip.

 

Featuring

Will Stevens, Golden Russett Farm. Shoreham, VT.

Audio Text

Another option I’m trying with wheat is to rest the field entirely the second season and the way I‘m doing that is to frost-seed clover. This clover was frost-seeded in April last year. I then went in in June and mowed the wheat off to release the clover seedlings and then let the clover go and let it grow all season and I’ll let it grow again this season before plowing it in next year for a vegetable crop.

Some of the advantages I hope to see coming from this fallow system are nitrogen fixation with the clover here, weed suppression and better tilth and soil health.

One of the things I like about putting legumes in my rotation is that I need the nitrogen source. The supply of manure that we’ve had in the past is drying up as ag economics change and so I’m going to need to find alternatives.

This video project was funded in part by the Northeast Sustainable Agriculture Research and Education Program (USDA).

This is an eOrganic article and was reviewed for compliance with National Organic Program regulations by members of the eOrganic community. Always check with your organic certification agency before adopting new practices or using new materials. For more information, refer to eOrganic's articles on organic certification.

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This work is supported by the USDA National Institute of Food and Agriculture, New Technologies for Ag Extension project.