Video Clip: Sweeps on Harvest Farm from Vegetable Farmers and their Weed Control Machines

Organic Agriculture June 02, 2011 Print Friendly and PDF

Source:

Vegetable Farmers and their Weed-Control Machines [DVD]. V. Grubinger and M.J. Else. 1996. University of Vermont Extension. Available for purchase at http://www.uvm.edu/vtvegandberry/Videos/weedvideo.htm (verified 31 Dec 2008).

This is a Vegetable Farmers and their Weed Control Machines video clip.

Featuring

Gary Gemme, Harvest Farm. Whately, MA.

Audio Text

After we go through with the Buddingh cultivators, we then leave the crop alone pretty much until it gets to a stage of growth where we can just sneak in one last time and that’s when we come in with this tractor with the big sweeps on it and we adjust them, the cultivating shanks, they’re adjustable so that the teeth are tipped down not as they are now, but they’re pointed more towards the ground, and we go through and hill them up and top dress them at the same time.

Now so far with the use of the Buddinghs, we’ve achieved weed control between the rows. Once we come in with these particular cultivators, we achieve weed control within the row because we hill up the dirt around the plants - we can bury weeds up to about two inches in height. We do that just prior to the canopy filling in and usually when we go in we also add fertilizer to give the crop enough food to carry it to maturity.

This video project was funded in part by the Northeast Sustainable Agriculture Research and Education Program (USDA).  

This is an eOrganic article and was reviewed for compliance with National Organic Program regulations by members of the eOrganic community. Always check with your organic certification agency before adopting new practices or using new materials. For more information, refer to eOrganic's articles on organic certification.

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This work is supported by the USDA National Institute of Food and Agriculture, New Technologies for Ag Extension project.