Commercialization Information at SeedQuest

Plant Breeding and Genomics March 27, 2012 Print Friendly and PDF

Author:

Allen Van Deynze, University of California, Davis

This page summarizes commercialization information that was developed by the Seed Biotechnology Center at UC Davis for SeedQuest and aggregated for eXtension.

Image Credit: The Seed Biotechnology Center at UC Davis.

This page summarizes commercialization information that was developed by the Seed Biotechnology Center at UC Davis for SeedQuest and aggregated for eXtension.

Identity Preservation

Identity preservation helps maintain unique varieties to supply diverse markets with agricultural commodities. For more information, see identity preservation.

Genetic Purity

Genetic purity is a measure of seed quality based on contamination by other varieties and species. Genetic impurities occur when seed becomes contaminated with seeds of other species and when the seed itself has resulted from pollen contamination. For more information, see genetic purity.

Genotyping

Genotyping is the process of determining the genetic makeup of individuals. Genotype can refer to the genetic makeup of a single location in the genome, multiple locations in the genome, or the sequence of the entire genome. Genotyping has many uses in plant breeding, such as the ability to test seedlings for the presence of genes involved in disease resistance. Genotyping also allows breeders to quickly determine if a plant is true-breeding, or homozygous, for important genes. For more information, see genotyping.

Regulation of Genetically Engineered Crops

In the United States, regulation of genetically engineered (GE) crops is done by the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA), the Food and Drug Administration (FDA), and the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). Regulation is necessary to ensure that GE crops are safe for use and consumption, are not contaminating other crops, and are not harming the environment. For more information, see regulation of genetically engineered varieties.

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Funding Statement

Development of this page was supported in part by the National Institute of Food and Agriculture (NIFA) Solanaceae Coordinated Agricultural Project, agreement 2009-85606-05673, administered by Michigan State University. Any opinions, findings, conclusions, or recommendations expressed in this publication are those of the author(s) and do not necessarily reflect the view of the United States Department of Agriculture.

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USDA / NIFA

This work is supported by the USDA National Institute of Food and Agriculture, New Technologies for Ag Extension project.