Next Generation Sequencing for Plant Breeders Webinar

Plant Breeding and Genomics October 24, 2012 Print Friendly and PDF

Authors:

Heather L. Merk, The Ohio State University; Allen Van Deynze, University of California, Davis

This webinar and the accompanying presentation (in pdf format at the bottom of the page), presented at the 2010 Tomato Disease Workshop, provide an overview of DNA sequencing technologies and the type of sequence obtained using Sanger sequencing, next/second generation sequencing, and third generation sequencing. The sequencing technologies are discussed in the context of plant breeding.

In the first video clip, Dr. Allen Van Deynze, University of California, Davis, provides an overview of Sanger sequencing, next generation/second generation sequencing, and third generation sequencing technologies. In addition, the sequencing technologies are compared based on the amount of sequence generated, the cost, and the sequence read length.

If you experience problems viewing this video connect to our YouTube channel or see the YouTube troubleshooting guide.

In the second video clip, Dr. Van Deynze provides visual representations of the portion of the genome sequenced using different sequencing technologies, and he discusses the potential utility of the sequence, from expressed sequence tags (ESTs), to the transcriptome, to the whole genome.

If you experience problems viewing this video connect to our YouTube channel or see the YouTube troubleshooting guide.

Find all the presentations from the 2010 Tomato Disease Workshop

Additional Resources

For a review of sequencing technologies,

  • Thompson, J. F., and P. M. Milos. 2011. The properties and applications of single molecule sequencing. Genome Biology 12: 217. (Available online at: genomebiology.com/2011/12/2/217) (verified 25 Feb 2011).

Funding Statement

Development of this lesson was supported in part by the National Institute of Food and Agriculture (NIFA) Solanaceae Coordinated Agricultural Project, agreement 2009-85606-05673, administered by Michigan State University. Any opinions, findings, conclusions, or recommendations expressed in this publication are those of the author(s) and do not necessarily reflect the view of the United States Department of Agriculture.

Mention of specific companies is not intended for promotional purposes.

Attachments:

Next_Gen_Sequencing.pdf (2.3 MB)

PBGworks 996

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USDA / NIFA

This work is supported by the USDA National Institute of Food and Agriculture, New Technologies for Ag Extension project.