Linkage Analysis and QTL Mapping in Tetraploids Webinar

Plant Breeding and Genomics October 24, 2012 Print Friendly and PDF

Author:

Kelly Zarka, Michigan State University

This page provides video for the webinar "Linkage analysis and QTL mapping in tetraploids" presented by Dr. Christine Hackett at the SolCAP workshop at the Potato Association of America meeting in August 2010. This workshop is in two parts: linkage analysis, and QTL mapping. Both parts provide theory and analysis demonstrations for tetraploid species.

Presenter: Christine Hackett, Biomathematics and Statistics Scotland, Dundee, UK.

This workshop is in two parts: linkage analysis, and QTL mapping. The first part is an overview of the theory of segregation analysis and linkage analysis in an autotetraploid species, such as potato, followed by a demonstration of the software program TetraploidMap for Windows on some potato marker data from the cross Stirling x 12601ab1. The second part is an overview of QTL mapping in an autotetraploid species, followed by a demonstration of how to perform QTL mapping using TetraploidMap for Windows and how to compare different QTL models.

You can view the webinar below or at the SolCAP website.

If you experience problems viewing this video connect to our YouTube channel or see the YouTube troubleshooting guide.

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Funding Statement

Development of this page was supported in part by the National Institute of Food and Agriculture (NIFA) Solanaceae Coordinated Agricultural Project, agreement 2009-85606-05673, administered by Michigan State University. Any opinions, findings, conclusions, or recommendations expressed in this publication are those of the author(s) and do not necessarily reflect the view of the United States Department of Agriculture.

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This work is supported by the USDA National Institute of Food and Agriculture, New Technologies for Ag Extension project.