Development and Characteristics of a Seven Month Old Baby

Parenting September 27, 2008 Print Friendly and PDF

Parenting Tips for Your 7 Month Old Baby

Contents

How I Grow

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  • I creep on my stomach. I may even crawl. Move the crib mattress to the lowest position, so I can’t climb up and fall out.
  • I also get around on my back by raising my behind and pushing with my feet.
  • I balance myself and sit for a while with no support.
  • I keep my legs straight when you put your hands under my arms and pull me up, and I try to stand by myself. Don’t be surprised if I fuss then because I don’t know how to sit down. Show me how to do it. It’s a little tricky to learn how to sit down again.
  • Be careful not to lift me by the arms. My bones can still be easily dislocated. Lift me by putting your hands under my arms.
  • I explore my body with my mouth and hands.
  • I might keep my diaper dry for up to two hours.
  • I may have some teeth.
  • I feed myself finger foods — but I’m pretty messy!
  • I play with a spoon and a cup, but I’m not good at using them yet.
  • I used to hold things in a clumsy way. Now, I may hold things between my thumb and forefinger, moving things from hand to hand and turning them around. I like to play with nesting cups, plastic bowls, and small blocks.
  • I turn my eyes and head to see you when you come in the room. If you think I might have a hearing problem, call the doctor.

How I Respond

  • I want to be included in all family activities.
  • I like to see and touch myself in the mirror.
  • I get excited when I see a picture of a baby.
  • I like to make things happen. I like to grab, shake, and bang things and put them in my mouth.
  • I like toys that make noise — such as bells, music boxes, and rattles.

How I Understand

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  • I can focus better now, and I spend lots of time examining things.
  • I can tell if something is near or far.
  • I can tell when people are angry or happy by the way they look and talk.
  • I can grab things and hold on to them, but letting loose is something I am just learning how to do. I may straighten my whole arm and fling things down because that is the only way that works for me right now.

How I Talk

  • I imitate the sounds I hear. That’s how I learn.
  • I say several sounds (such as ma, mi, da, di, and ba) — all in one breath.
  • I watch your face when you talk to me. I may even try to put my hand in your mouth to see where the sound is coming from. I’m a smart kid!

How I Feel

  • I may be afraid of strangers, so stay with me when they’re around. Allow extra time for me to get comfortable with a baby sitter or child care teacher. Gently tell me that you will be back, and then leave. It will take many months for me to learn that you really will come back.
  • I feel strongly about what I want and don’t want to do.
  • My sense of humor is starting to show. I feel playful, and I like to tease you. I may laugh if you pretend to eat from my spoon or when you do other silly things.

For more information on your baby's development, check out developmental milestones at the American Academy of Pediatrics Web site http://www.aap.org/healthtopics/stages.cfm or the Centers for Disease Contol at http://www.cdc.gov/ncbddd/autism/actearly/.


Learn more about Your 7 Month Old Baby from Just In Time Parenting. You can also go to our Resource Links for additional information on child care and development.
Note to Parents: When reading this newsletter, remember: Every baby is different. Children may do things earlier or later than described here. This newsletter gives equal space and time to both sexes. If he or she is used, we are talking about all babies.
References: These materials were adapted by authors from Extension Just in Time Parenting Newsletters in California, Delaware, Georgia, Iowa, Kentucky, Maine, Tennessee, Nevada, New Hampshire, New Mexico, and Wisconsin.

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This work is supported by the USDA National Institute of Food and Agriculture, New Technologies for Ag Extension project.