Content tagged "woody biomass supply"

Woody Biomass Availability, Sources and Supply

Wood Energy Updated: February 06, 2014

Articles in this section will introduce the numerous sources of woody biomass throughout the United States. The discussion is not limited to forestry biomass...

Traditional Pulpwood and Sawtimber Crops

Wood Energy Updated: March 12, 2010

By: S. Ashton In addition to residues, waste, and dedicated energy crops, pulp wood and commercial-grade timber can be used as an energy or bioproducts...

Timber Harvest Residues

Wood Energy Updated: March 12, 2010

By: S. Ashton Residues from forest harvesting operations include logging residues (i.e. branches, tops, and stumps) left on-site, low-quality commercially...

Waste and Debris Collection

Wood Energy Updated: March 12, 2010

By: Lauren McDonnell Two major sources of urban wood residue are the woody portion of municipal solid waste (MSW) and construction and demolition debris. Of...

Short Rotation Woody Crops

Wood Energy Updated: March 12, 2010

By: S. Ashton Fast growing short rotation woody crops (SRWC), such as hybrid poplars, willows, and other species, are specifically grown to be an energy...

Natural Catastrophic Event Recovery

Wood Energy Updated: March 12, 2010

Clean up operations after natural disasters, such as hurricanes and ice storms, produce large amounts of debris that have traditionally been piled up to...

Forest Health Improvement Removals

Wood Energy Updated: March 12, 2010

By: Sarah Ashton A number of management activities aimed toward increasing the health of forests can require removal of woody biomass. Fuel load reduction,...

Wood Processing Residues

Wood Energy Updated: March 12, 2010

Residues from forest products manufacturing such as sawdust, black liquor, and bark are commonly used to create on-site energy in the form of heat and power....

Connect with us

  • Twitter
  • Facebook
  • YouTube
  • Pinterest
  • Google+

Welcome

This is where you can find research-based information from America's land-grant universities enabled by eXtension.org

LOCATE

Latest Tweets

USDA / NIFA

This work is supported by the USDA National Institute of Food and Agriculture, New Technologies for Ag Extension project.